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25 Jun.2014

Paper recycling in Europe at 71.7% - A reliable performance secures access to valuable raw material

The paper recycling rate in Europe reached 71.7% in 2013. The total amount of paper collected and recycled in the European paper sector remains stable at just over 57 million tonnes, despite decreasing paper consumption in Europe.

Recycling has increased by 45% (18 million tonnes) since 1998, the base year for the first voluntary commitment set in the European Declaration on Paper Recycling by the European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC).

The European paper recycling rate is starting to level out and keeping it at a high rate is becoming progressively more challenging. Not only are quantities changing but so are the different paper consumption patterns.

The continuing sharp decline in newspaper consumption will significantly affect overall paper recycling levels, as newspapers are traditionally one of the best recycled paper products along with corrugated boxes. Conversely, tissue and sanitary paper consumption is increasing but cannot be accepted for recycling due to hygiene reasons. Overall, 21% of paper consumption is not recyclable or collectable.

The large majority of the 11 European countries currently still under a 60% recycling rate have reported an improved performance. In parallel, 13 European countries have already exceeded the targeted 70% recycling rate. Paper fibre is now recycled an average of 3.5 times in Europe, far exceeding the world-wide average of 2.4.

“Making recycling easy and simple year after year requires a huge effort by the paper value chain, and we are pleased to report the positive results”, says ERPC chairwoman Beatrice Klose. “Despite challenging circumstances, paper recycling has continued to perform consistently well”, she concludes.

Secure access to raw materials has become an increasingly strategic economic issue in Europe. Paper recycling is truly an industry “made in Europe”. In line with EU policies, this industry should be properly safeguarded to remain so. The paper recycling sector is ready and able to add more green jobs, skills and innovations to the European circular economy.

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For more information, please contact the ERPC Secretariat, Jori Ringman, at +32 2 627 49 19, +32 478 255070 (gsm), erpc@cepi.org or visit www.paperforrecycling.eu

Notes to Editor:

• 2013 ERPC Monitoring Report: http://www.paperforrecycling.eu/publications/erpc-publications
• The European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) was set up as an industry self-initiative in November 2000 to monitor progress towards meeting the paper recycling targets set out in the 2000 European Declaration on Paper Recycling. Since then the commitments in the Declaration are renewed every five years.
In 2011, the ERPC committed itself to meeting and maintaining both a voluntary recycling rate target of 70% in the EU-27 plus Switzerland and Norway by 2015 as well as qualitative targets in areas such as waste prevention, ecodesign, and research and development.
• Members of ERPC are ACE, CEPI, CITPA, EMFA, ERPA, ETS, INGEDE, INTERGRAF, FEPE. Supporters include the EuPIA, FINAT, RADTECH Europe. The European Commission, DG Environment and DG Enterprise, are permanent observers of the ERPC.
 

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24 Jun.2014

ICFPA: Global Forest Products Industry Promotes Contributions to and Benefits of Forest-based Bioeconomy

WASHINGTON – The 22nd session of the Committee on Forestry (COFO 22) of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is currently taking place in Rome, Italy, June 23-27. On the agenda are discussions about the forest-based bioeconomy and the socioeconomic benefits of forests, which are both supported by the International Council of Forest and Paper Associations (ICFPA).

Serving as the forest products industry’s advocate at the interna¬tional level, the ICFPA promotes the industry’s multiple benefits and contributions to the bioeconomy, which include resource efficiency, recycling, bio-based products, innovative technologies, carbon sequestration, and improving the well-being of communities.

“The global forest products industry has the potential to answer the increasing demand for sustainable products,” said ICFPA President Donna Harman. “Through sustainable forest management, our industry provides products people need – like food, energy and shelter – while also developing innovative solutions to challenges posed by the growing world population.”

ICFPA members participate in the FAO’s Advisory Committee on Sustainable Forest-based Industries (ACSFI), where they provide expert advice and make recommendations to the FAO on forestry, the forest products industry and related topics.

“For the FAO Forestry Programme, our long-standing collaboration with the private sector through ACSFI and ICFPA provides a valuable platform for increasing our delivery,” said FAO Assistant Director General Eduardo Rojas. “We see clear benefits from using private sector forestry and forest industry groups as a sounding board for strengthening our actions under the FAO Strategic Objectives. Their ideas on eliminating food insecurity and making forestry more productive and sustainable are of great value for us.”

The ICFPA represents some 30 national and regional forest and paper associations around the world. Together, ICFPA members represent nearly 90 percent of global paper production and 60 percent of global wood production.

For more information about the sustainability of the global forest and paper industry, visit icfpa.org.

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24 Jun.2014

Social Dialogue of the European paper sector

 

Joint resolution

Drawing the conclusions of a working group meeting of the European Social Dialogue Committee for the Paper Sector on the EU bio-energy policy in the context of the current and future climate and energy ambitions of the European Union, IndustriAll European Trade Union and CEPI participants:

• Acknowledge the potential benefits that bio-energy can deliver in terms of climate change mitigation, as well as increased security of energy supply. These benefits can be delivered if certain conditions are fulfilled, in particular in terms of reliable carbon accounting, and in terms of sustainable sourcing of the feedstocks.
• Stress the fact that the pulp and paper sector, as an energy-intensive industrial sector which is facing high raw material prices on the biomass market at the same time, is in a difficult position. Hence, the impact of the EU bio-energy policy on competitiveness and employment in the European pulp and paper sector is of major concern to us.
• Identify a risk of distorted competition on the biomass markets, mainly due to the targets set and the related support/subsidies mechanisms put in place by the Member States.

Therefore, IndustriAll European Trade Union and CEPI call on the EU to:

• Strengthen policies that proportionally promote the efficient use/conversion of biomass;
• Establish a real sustainable biomass supply policy that supports the current demand-driven policies. Such policy should include provisions to increase the biomass potential in Europe, and to better mobilise the needed feedstocks.
• Place the “cascading use” principle at the core of its climate and energy policy, with a view to ensure the most efficient use of the available biomass, in particular to contribute to the EU growth and jobs objectives.
• Identify and possibly remove subsidies that encourage inefficient use of biomass and distort fair competition on the biomass markets.

 

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18 Jun.2014

WWF press release: International plantation summit looks at forestry for the future

Cape Town is playing host to an international forestry meeting, the New Generation Plantations (NGP) annual summit that will look at challenges facing the forestry industry today. The summit, that takes place at the Vineyard Hotel in Cape Town on 18 and 19 June, will look at two of the most important and challenging forestry frontiers today, namely social forestry and land-use.

Also participants from agriculture sectors, such as the sugar industry, will be attending the summit, as the NGP aims to broaden and share its experiences and learning with agricultural sectors in a resilient landscape approach. Set up by WWF in 2007, NGP brings together companies, government forest agencies and conservationists from around the world to explore, share and promote better ways of planning and managing plantations. NGP seeks to engage with stakeholders, learn from them and to share these lessons. It is underpinned by the philosophy that well-managed plantations in the right places can take pressure off natural forests and eco-systems and improve the welfare of local communities. Read more about NGP experiences and achievements here.

A world with seven billion people requires forestry and farming practices that produce more with less land and water, while empowering communities to achieve their aspirations. In many rural areas, forestry companies, with their access to resources, are best placed to act as agents for development, but struggle to integrate social policies into their business.

Luis Neves Silva, the NGP manager from WWF International, explains: "NGP is a space of trust, bridging different worlds. It creates a zone for open discussions and exchange where we can learn from each other by seeing what others are doing faced with similar issues, and to better understand the concerns of other stakeholders. Instead of coming with the answers, NGP helps to frame the right questions.”

Over the two-day meeting, over a hundred conferees from 20 nationalities will put their heads together to come up with ideas about how to enable skilled, motivated local people to run successful forestry businesses and manage productive plantations on their land to secure supply, reduce risks, and benefit communities and investors.

According to Morné du Plessis, Chief Executive of WWF South Africa, “Forestry and agriculture are important elements of productive landscapes, but we need to plan plantations as living landscapes that provide broad benefits to local and downstream communities. It is no longer good enough to see agricultural and forestry land simply as only providing food and timber. We need to recognise that these landscapes also generate water, absorb carbon and harbour critical biodiversity, and they may help to control pests and pollinate crops.”

A joint learning journey will continue in the field at the next NGP study tour in South Africa in November “The resilient landscape approach to freshwater ecosystem stewardship”

Editor’s Notes:
About New Generations Plantation
The NGP platform is a place for sharing knowledge about good plantation practices and learning from experience, through events such as study tours, workshops and conferences.
Over the coming decades, plantations are set to expand at a rapid rate to meet growing demand for paper, timber and energy. While plantations can be controversial, the NGP concept suggests that well-managed plantations in the right places can take pressure off natural forests, work in harmony with natural ecosystems, and improve the welfare of local communities. Find out more at www.newgenerationplantations.org

About WWF
WWF is one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organisations, with almost six million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.
Ultimately our aim is to inspire all South Africans to live in harmony with nature for the well-being of our country and its people.

See www.wwf.org.za for more information on the organisation’s activities in South Africa.
WWF stands for the World Wide Fund for Nature. The organization prefers to be referred to just by the acronym.
You can follow WWF on twitter http://twitter.com/WWFSouthAfrica

For more information, images and interviews:
Andrea Weiss
media@wwf.org.za
+27 (0)82 920 5933
 

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09 May.2014

Global Forest and Paper Industry Highlights Benefits of Bio-based Packaging at Interpack Trade Fair

WASHINGTON/Brussels – On May 9, the International Council of Forest and Paper Associations (ICFPA) will participate in the special event International Coalition Bio-based Packaging: A Green Food Saver at the 2014 Interpack trade fair held in Düsseldorf, Germany. ICFPA is partnering on the event with the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and the Technology Research Centre of Finland (VTT).

“Paper-based packaging plays an important role in minimizing food waste,” said ICFPA President Donna Harman. “By providing bio-based means to transport, protect and preserve food, our industry is helping to meet the needs of the growing global population.”
Paper-based packaging is made from a renewable resource – well-managed forests – and delivers a sustainable packaging option to bring food from the field to the home safely and in excellent condition: corrugated boxes protect food when it is shipped to stores; paperboard is used to package food for efficient stocking and display; and paper bags give customers an environmentally-friendly way to transport their purchases.

In addition, new and innovative paper-based packaging is continuously developed to increase functional use – including optimal food preservation – and to better serve consumers.

Paper and paper-based packaging industries around the world make great efforts to recover, and increase recovery of, their products for recycling. Independent data indicate that the global recovery rate for corrugated paperboard packaging is approaching 90 percent.

“On top of that our sector’s use of natural, renewable bio-based resources together with our knowledge of paper recycling systems, fiber processing and of wood and fiber chemistry qualifies us as a major player in the bio-economy. Well-positioning the paper-based packaging sector for the future, “stressed Teresa Presas, Director General of the Confederation of European Paper Industries and member of the ICFPA.

The ICFPA represents more than 30 national and regional forest and paper associations around the world. Together, ICFPA members represent nearly 90 percent of global paper production and 50 percent of global wood production.

CEPI is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry in 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway). CEPI represents some 520 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 950 paper mills.

For more information about the sustainability of the global forest and paper industry, visit icfpa.org.

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07 May.2014

Council adopts legal acts for public and private partnerships

The Council of the European Union has adopted the legal acts for a new generation of public and private partnerships that will allow large-scale, long-term innovation projects to be carried out under the umbrella of Horizon 2020, the EU's research and innovation framework programme.
The innovation investment package, which implements the Innovation Union strategy to stimulate the creation of growth and jobs, will contribute to pool research and innovation investments up to 22 billion € in sectors facing major societal challenges in the next seven years.

Five public-private partnerships will be set up or further developed as Joint Technology Initiatives (JTIs). One of them is the bio-based industries ("BBI"), to develop new and competitive bio-based value chains that replace the need for fossil fuels and have a strong impact on rural development.  The industry is organised in a Bio-based Industries Consortium, with CEPI being one of its members.

The Consortium currently brings together more than 60 European large and small companies, clusters and organisations across technology, industry, agriculture and forestry. They have all committed to invest in collaborative research, development and demonstration of bio-based technologies within the Public Private Partnership (PPP).

You can find out more about it at http://www.biconsortium.eu/

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27 Mar.2014

CEPI receives two-star 'Ecodynamic company' label

The Brussels regional energy and environment agency renewed CEPI's two-star 'Ecodynamic company' label. This award is delivered to Brussels-based associations and companies with high environmental quality standards. 

We are very proud to have received this honour. A big thank you to the staff members who worked on the application and helped obtain the label. Here it is!

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12 Mar.2014

CEPI at the Innovation Convention 2014

CEPI had a stand at the European Commission's Innovation Convention next to Google glass and Microsoft!

Our stand was focused on Deep Eutectic Solvents, the winner of the Two Team Project. As you can in this photo, it was a big success. It gathered interest from participants with different profiles, ranging from European Commission employees to students, companies and scientists.

We would like to thank Sappi for providing the material for the stand as well as Eindhoven university for sending a PhD student who did an excellent job explaining the technical side of DES.

View all photos.
 

CEPI staff members explaining Deep Eutectic Solvents and the Two Team Project

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24 Jan.2014

Focus is back on industry in EU policy, but will it work?

The fact that the 2030 Energy and Climate package includes an analysis of energy costs and was published together with the European Industrial Renaissance Communication is a landmark shift in EU policy. The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) interprets this as a signal showing the European Commission is starting to take industrial competitiveness seriously. However, there are still important steps to be taken.

In practice, this new package will not change the competitiveness of industry in the short run. The high pile of documents released by the Commission analyses and promises, but at the end it only proposes one legal act – the change of the EU ETS. In this regard, CEPI welcomes the Commission proposal to keep EU ETS unchanged up to 2020 to give the necessary stability for investments in EU industry. But is this enough?

The Commission finally acknowledged energy prices in Europe are uncompetitive, as electricity costs for industry are twice that of US competitors. It also rightfully recognised the way the EU supported renewable energy was unsustainable. It is now up to EU member states to change this. But more is needed. The gas market needs to be reformed. Energy interconnections between EU member states need to increase urgently.

The impact on European competitiveness of a 40% CO2 reduction target by 2030 for the entire EU economy cannot be underestimated either. The suggested changes by the Commission for industrial sectors will require emission reductions of 43% in 2030, 65% in 2040 and 87% in 2050. The European Council in March needs to assess the feasibility of this package in detail and develop tools that support the deployment of innovative low-carbon solutions in industry. This is especially needed, if no further global action is taken and the EU Economy does not improve.

Additionally, the cost of decarbonising the current power sector - a key challenge - is not addressed. This will most likely increase electricity bills, which the European Commission accepted as being too high already. The EU will have to explore new models of decarbonising the power sector, other than via the carbon price alone.

Specifically related to the European pulp and paper industry, CEPI applauds the long awaited recognition of the negative impact of subsidised bioenergy on EU wood markets. And CEPI welcomes the announcement in the 2030 Energy and Climate package to further explore funding tools for breakthrough technologies.

But the bottom line is: policy needs to be put into practice. “We appreciate the refocus on industrial policy. It is a good sign that the Commission recognises again our role in creating jobs and growth for Europe. However, the proposed measures for an effective industrial policy need to be translated into concrete actions as soon as possible”, said Teresa Presas, CEPI Director General.

For more information, please contact Daniela Haiduc at d.haiduc@cepi.org, mobile: +32(0)473562936

Note to the Editor

2030 Energy and Climate Package from the European Commission:
http://ec.europa.eu/energy/2030_en.htm

Industrial renaissance Communication:
http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/initiatives/mission-growth/index_en.htm

 

 

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28 Nov.2013

Sustainable paper industry leads bioeconomy efforts in Europe

CEPI releases 6th biennial sustainability report

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) launched their latest sustainability report at the European Paper Week in Brussels. The report results verify the exceptional concurrence of sustainability and competitiveness in the European pulp and paper industry. The industry is exemplary in creating value “made in Europe”, focusing on innovation and resource efficiency, while advancing the bioeconomy.

Being resource efficient and reducing raw material consumption makes both sustainable and economic sense. A good example in the European pulp and paper industry is the use of residues from papermaking to produce renewable energy. The industry reduced their CO2 emissions per tonne of product by 43%. Additionally, turning residues from recycling operations into useful products is an interesting illustration of the circular economy. On top of that the European paper recycling rate is at a world record level of 71.7%.

Teresa Presas, CEPI Director General, emphasised the importance of the paper industry in Europe: “Our industry is creating value “made in Europe”. As the sustainability report shows more than 82% of our raw materials come from Europe and most of our suppliers are European companies. 23% of our products “made in Europe” are exported to the global market. This unique case should not be taken for granted and we aim at continuous improvement in adverse conditions. “

The European pulp and paper industry is at the core of the bioeconomy, producing not only the original bio-based product that paper is, but also products that replace fossil fuel-based products. In this way, the industry has become a strategic sector in the EU economy, actively. As the crisis has accelerated structural changes in the industry since the last report in 2011, pulp and paper companies have started looking in a systematic way at new business models and new products.

Sustainability is a vision towards a business development based on sustainable practices that address society’s key challenges on a long lasting basis and the paper industry is facing a few challenges ahead. Resource scarcity and climate change are amongst the most critical challenges, in addition to a missing investment friendly environment in Europe that supports jobs and social benefits.

 

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For more information, please contact Daniela Haiduc at d.haiduc@cepi.org, mobile: +32(0)473 562 936
 

Note to the Editor

Download CEPI’s 6th Sustainability report: http://www.cepi-sustainability.eu/

Video interviews of CEPI Directors on sustainability: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL53E43E5E81A581E8&feature=edit_ok

Sustainability messages summarised (video): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDSifOUXhX0&feature=c4-overview&list=UU52Y4zM-iRSb22hrUBgvGgQ

 

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